Monday, 21 May 2018

Joy Cowley - Author


Joy Cowley
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A little about Joy’s life / family.
Cassia Joy Summers better known as Joy Cowley was born in Levin on the 7 of August 1936.Aged 81 her books continue to wow everyone in NZ. Cowleys parents where Peter Summers and Cassia Gedge. Cowley has four lovely kids they are James Cowley, Edward Cowley, Sharon Cowley & Judith Cowley. She has married an amazing 3 times first at the age of twenty to dairy farmer Ted Cowley with whom she had her four kids.After their marriage ended in 1967, Cowley married Malcolm Mason, a Wellington writer and accountant who died in 1985.In 1989, Cowley married Terry Coles.

Joy’s books.
There are over 400 early readers, about twenty picture books, three novels and two collections of short stories for young readers. For adults there are five novels, a collection of short stories, articles and spiritual material.In total she has written 431 books.Which is quite a lot.Joy  has written lot’s of books over the years but her top five are Snake and lizard,Mrs. Wishy-Washy's Farm,Bow down, Shadrach, Dunger & The duck in the gun

Joy’s life now.
Cowley lived with Her husband Terry Coles, and an assortment of animals, for many years in the Marlborough Sounds, but in 2004 they moved to a wharf apartment in Wellington so Coles could be nearer medical services.As Coles' health deteriorated, Wellington's stairs and traffic became too much for him, and the couple moved again to Featherston, Wairarapa, New Zealand, in a little cottage well suited to a couple of senior citizens, where she now lives.But they still have a house in the Marlborough Sounds where they lived for many years. She has 13 grandchildren, two writing desks and still writes full-time.

by Milly

Thursday, 17 May 2018

Richie McCaw - Rugby player to Author - by Ryan L


Richie  Mccaw

Career before writing a book

Before Richie Mccaw wrote a book he was one of the best rugby players of all time. He was the first all blacks player ever to captain 100 matches with ending out with 148 games captained. Richie played openside flanker for the All Blacks, Crusaders and the Canterbury rugby team.


After He Stopped Playing Rugby

After Richie stopped playing rugby he went on to write an autobiography and a normal book. Richie's autobiography is about the real Richie McCaw which is about him when he is not on the playing field and what he does around the town.

This sums up my report on Richie McCaw the rugby player that wrote a book when he retired.

Thursday, 12 April 2018

Learning Celebration

It was fabulous to see a number of whānau come in to the class yesterday to see what Tangaroa students he’s been working on this term. 

Our overall focus for the year is Identity and this concept has been woven through all our curriculum areas in Tangaroa.  

Our specific focus this term has been as a part of the health curriculum, getting to know who we are as people and how we fit together. Students have done individual research, poetry, maths work, mihi, visual language tasks, discussion activities, art works,  meta cognitive tasks, reading, history, and a whole heap more.   














Friday, 23 March 2018

Student Health Team attend forum

This week our student health team attended a forum along with teams from a number of other schools at Wharenui. They did a great job sharing their project and got some great ideas from other students.   Thanks to Maliyah for winning the jar of UV beads by guessing the number in the jar!  Wharenui School did a great jobs of organising interesting activities for us to take part in.  And there were some serious dance moves going on!














Inquiry review

Last week we did a review of our understanding about identity, both what we knew about the topic, and ourselves. Students answered 25 yes/no question on a grid, coloring in for yes and leaving blank for no. 

Students were really interested to see how everyone different everyone was. 




Inanga Study

The Inanga Study has started for Tangaroa & Atā Hapara students. A short lesson by Kathryn and Kirsty about the programme was delivered to students last Tuesday. The students found the details and facts about the programme were fascinating and realised that 'inanga' meant young and that 'whitebait' meant the older. Whitebait is in decline and this programme enables the sustainability of this species.

The field trip on Friday involved walking down to the Otakaro site which is known as Lake Kate Sheppard from where the previous retirement home was located.

Students were told about the spring tide and when it was due and how long it took from Lyttleton to get to Otakaro-two hours for the tide to reach the lake. The location when the freshwater and saltwater meet is called the Mahinga Kai or the 'love zone'. This is the spawning ground for the whitebait.

This is going to be an interesting study. Keep an eye on this blog for more interesting developments.